Southwest ADA Center

Welcome to the Employer Portal!

We hope that the information provided on this page will be of use – and of interest – to employers. Whether you own a small business or are part of a large corporation, a nonprofit agency, or a government entity, knowing how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will impact your business on a daily basis, and knowing how to make sure that you are in compliance with the ADA and related disability laws, will help to ensure your success.

If you or your employees have questions about the ADA, be sure to call 1.800.949.4232.

Custom Training for Your Business
The Southwest ADA Center can provide customized onsite training for your business, your supervisors, your human resources staff, and/or your employees.

Table of Contents

**Titles marked with an asterisk (*) are also available in Spanish

The ADA and its interaction with other laws

Overview of Employment Discrimination Laws
An overview of the many different federal employment discrimination statutes, and their implementing regulations, as well as links to recent cases involving employment discrimination claims.

*The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Injured Workers.
Discusses the relationship between ADA and injured workers, pre-employment medical examination, medical records, filing a workers compensation claim, reasonable accommodation, and filing a charge under the ADA.

*Leave Rights under the FMLA and the ADA: The Intersection of Two Laws Impacting Employee Leave.
An overview of ADA Leave Protection, overlapping coverage between the ADA and the FMLA, compliance, insurance coverage.

The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the ADA, and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act – How They Work Together and Apart
Although these are three separate laws, there are ways in which they overlap. Knowing the interplay between the laws can be as important as knowing the laws themselves.

*Occupational Safety and Health and Disability Nondiscrimination in the Workplace: Complying with Dual Requirements. Discusses the intersection of disability nondiscrimination laws and health and safety requirements in the workplace, what Title I of the ADA requires, what the Occupational Safety and Health Act requires, and how the ADA’s reasonable accommodation requirement interacts with OSHA.

*Mediation and Title I of the ADA. Defines mediation and discusses ADA Mediation Guidelines, how mediation differs from litigation, and confidentiality

Workers’ Compensation and the ADA

Interaction between Workers’ Compensation statutes and the ADA.

Your Responsibilities As An Employer
This EEOC Fact Sheet covers the basic facts about which employers are covered, which employment activities are covered, and what the responsibilities of employers involve.

Tax Incentives

Tax Credits and Deductions
Business tax credits and deductions for employing individuals with disabilities

Small Businesses

The ADA Primer for Small Businesses
This is the EEOC’s handbook about the responsibilities of small businesses under Title I of the ADA. It includes information about what to do if a discrimination charge is filed against your business, as well as tax incentives to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities.

Reasonable Accommodations and Small Employers
Smaller employers have unique challenges when it comes to providing reasonable accommodations.

Policies, Forms, & Checklists

Sample ADA Policies, Forms, and Checklists
Samples from other private businesses, corporations, and government entities.

Small Business Model Reasonable Accommodation Policy
Having a written “Reasonable Accommodation Policy” can be an important part of assisting employees in getting the help they need to be successful and productive. This model policy provides ideas for such a policy.

*The Role of Disability Management Programs in ADA Compliance.
Describes Disability Management, Assuring Compliance and the primary DM functions that intersect with ADA compliance.
Employment Process

*The ADA and Personnel Training.
Discusses the ADA, which personnel in your organization should receive training on the ADA, which types of ADA information should be shared with your personnel, and where to get further resources to conduct training on the ADA.

*Diversity and the ADA.
Discusses employer considerations in addressing cultural diversity issues and the implications of the ADA such as the accommodation process and ways to heighten awareness of the ADA through diversity initiatives in business and industry.

*The ADA and Total Quality Management.
Discusses the concept of Total Quality Management and how it can be used to support successful implementation of the ADA and the reasonable accommodation process

Accommodations

Working from Home or Telework as a Reasonable Accommodation
Many employers have discovered the benefits of allowing employees to work at home through telework (also known as telecommuting) programs. Telework has allowed employers to attract and retain valuable workers by boosting employee morale and productivity. Technological advancements have also helped increase telework options.

Custom Training for Your Business
The Southwest ADA Center can provide customized onsite training for your business, your supervisors, your human resources staff, and/or your employees.

Job Accommodation Process
The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) has a long history of providing information regarding worksite accommodation ideas. JAN’s Job Accommodation process involves managing five steps for successful worksite accommodation outcomes. The process requires specific attention to the uniqueness of each individual’s accommodation needs.

Small Business Model Reasonable Accommodation Policy
Having a written “Reasonable Accommodation Policy” can be an important part of assisting employees in getting the help they need to be successful and productive. This model policy provides ideas for such a policy.

Reasonable Accommodation and Undue Hardship
Title I of the ADA requires an employer to provide reasonable accommodation to qualified individuals with disabilities who are employees or applicants for employment, except when such accommodation would cause an undue hardship. This Guidance sets forth an employer's legal obligations regarding reasonable accommodation.

*Reasonable Accommodation under the ADA.
Describes the requirements for reasonable accommodation for employees with disabilities under the ADA, including the accommodation process, safety considerations, worker misconduct and accommodation requirements, and resources for further information.

Reasonable Accommodation for Attorneys with Disabilities
Attorneys with disabilities may need a variety of accommodations to be able to perform essential functions of jobs. This guidance from the EEOC offers advice specifically tailored to the employment of attorneys.

Specific Kinds of Employers

Guide for Restaurant and Other Food Service Employers
The ADA is important to food service employers and employees. Food service employers must avoid discriminating against people with disabilities while obeying strict public health rules. Food service workers with disabilities have rights under the ADA when applying for jobs or when working for a restaurant, cafeteria, or other food service employer.

Responsibilities to Multinational Employers
The globalization of business activity has resulted in employers from around the world assigning increasing numbers of personnel internationally. This helps multinational employers determine their obligations under U.S. equal employment opportunity laws.

Best Practices for the Employment of People with Disabilities in State Government
This report highlights best practices of nine states that promote the hiring, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities in state government jobs.

Federal Workforce and the ADA
How the ADA applies to the federal employees and employers.

Disability Employment Policies and Practices in U.S. Federal Government Agencies
A survey of U.S. Federal agencies was initiated by the Presidential Task Force on Employment of Adults with Disabilities, and 403 representatives of U.S. Federal agencies were surveyed to determine their response to the employment nondiscrimination, affirmative action, and accommodation requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

Disability Employment Policies and Practices in Private and Federal Sector Organizations
A survey of U.S. Federal agencies was initiated by the Presidential Task Force on Employment of Adults with Disabilities, and 403 representatives of U.S. Federal agencies were surveyed to determine their response to the employment nondiscrimination, affirmative action, and accommodation requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

Disability Employment Policies and Practices in U.S. Federal Government Agencies: EEO/HR and Supervisor Perspectives
The Presidential Task Force on the Employment of Adults with Disabilities (PTFEAD) provided support to Cornell University to conduct research on the policy and practice efforts of federal agency personnel in recruiting and retaining persons with disabilities in Federal employment. A survey of U. S. federal agency HR/EEO responses to the employment disability nondiscrimination requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 was completed in 1999. A follow-up study of federal agency supervisors and managers about their experience in accommodation and employment of persons with disabilities was initiated in Spring of 2001. This report is a summary of major findings from each of these surveys, and in addition includes a comparison across selected items where appropriate.

Applicants

Job Applicants and the ADA
Employers have responsibilities to job applicants who have disabilities. Knowing what these responsibilities are, and when disability-related questions and exams are permissible, will assist you in making sure that the ADA is not violated.

Pre-employment Disability Related Questions and Medical Examinations
An employer may ask disability-related questions and require medical exams only after an applicant has been given a conditional job offer. This EEOC Enforcement Guidance explains there provisions of the ADA.

*Pre-employment Screening Considerations and the ADA
Discusses aspects of recruitment, job advertising, applications, job descriptions, interviewing, job testing, medical examinations, drug testing, physical agility tests, and safety concerns.

*Pre-employment Testing and the ADA
Discusses legal and regulatory requirements, test validity models and types of testing accommodations.

Medical Information

Medical Information as Part of Emergency Evacuation Planning
Employers should are have emergency procedures in place to ensure the safe evacuation of all employees. A comprehensive emergency evacuation plan should provide for prompt and effective assistance to individuals whose medical conditions may necessitate it. Many employers have asked how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act affect their ability to achieve this goal.

Pre-employment Disability Related Questions and Medical Examinations
An employer may ask disability-related questions and require medical exams only after an applicant has been given a conditional job offer. This EEOC Enforcement Guidance explains there provisions of the ADA.

*Pre-employment Screening Considerations and the ADA
Discusses aspects of recruitment, job advertising, applications, job descriptions, interviewing, job testing, medical examinations, drug testing, physical agility tests, and safety concerns.

*Pre-employment Testing and the ADA
Discusses legal and regulatory requirements, test validity models and types of testing accommodations.

Medical Examinations under the ADA
This enforcement guidance focuses on the ADA's limitations on disability-related inquiries and medical examinations during employment.

*Employee Medical Exams and Disability-Related Inquiries under the ADA: Guidance for Employers Regarding Current Employees. An overview of the ADA provisions on medical exams and all employees, temporary employees, Leave Issues, payment for exams, and situation examples.

Specific Disabilities

Blindness and Vision Impairment in the Workplace
Explains how the ADA might apply to job applicants and employees with vision impairments. Discusses when a vision impairment is a disability under the ADA; under what circumstances an employer may ask an applicant or employee questions about a vision impairment; what types of reasonable accommodations employees with visual disabilities may need; and how an employer can prevent harassment of employees with visual disabilities or any other disability.

Diabetes in the Workplace
Explains when diabetes is a disability under the ADA; when an employer may ask an applicant or employee questions about her diabetes; what types of reasonable accommodations employees with diabetes may need; and how an employer should handle safety concerns about applicants and employees with diabetes.

Epilepsy in the Workplace
Explains when epilepsy is considered a disability under the ADA; when an employer may ask an applicant or employee questions about epilepsy and how it should treat voluntary disclosures; what types of reasonable accommodations employees with epilepsy may need; how an employer should handle safety concerns about applicants and employees with epilepsy; and how employers can ensure that no employee is harassed because of epilepsy or any other disability.

Intellectual Disabilities (Mental Retardation) in the Workplace
Explains when a condition qualifies as a disability under the ADA; under what circumstances an employer may ask an applicant or employee or a third party (such as the family member of an applicant or employee) questions about an intellectual disability; what types of reasonable accommodations may be needed by applicants and employees with intellectual disabilities; how to address safety concerns and conduct issues in the workplace; and how an employer can prevent harassment of employees with intellectual disabilities.

Cancer in the Workplace
Explains how the ADA might apply to job applicants and employees who have or had cancer -- when cancer is a disability under the ADA; when an employer may ask an applicant or employee questions about his or her cancer and how it should treat voluntary disclosures; what types of reasonable accommodations employees with cancer may need; and how employers can ensure that they do not discriminate against applicants and employees with cancer.

*Your Employees and Cancer-Working Together
Discusses what cancer is and some treatments, and what could be reasonable accommodation under the ADA for an employee with cancer.

Custom Training for Your Business
The Southwest ADA Center can provide customized onsite training for your business, your supervisors, your human resources staff, and/or your employees.

Improving Work Performance for Individuals with Schizophrenia
Most people with schizophrenia and other severe mental illnesses want to work and evidence is mounting that they can gain competitive employment with sufficient accommodations and supports. After two decades of research, supported employment can now be regarded as evidence based practice that is referred to as gradualistic approaches to rehabilitation.

Accommodating Employees with Hidden Disabilities
Hidden disabilities, while not necessarily noticeable, are address in the ADA because hidden disabilities can result in functional limitations which substantially limit major life activities.

Do Back Belts Protect Workers?
Back injuries account for about 20% of all work-related injuries and illness.

Helping Persons with Cognitive Disabilities to be Productive
Workforce productivity is a common concern among employers. Many persons with cognitive disabilities, such as mental retardation, sometimes are initially unable to work fast enough to satisfy job requirements. The best way to improve and maintain production is to use strategies that are naturally found in the workplace.

Telephone Access for Persons with Speech Disabilities
Speech to Speech Relay (STS) is a service mandated by the Federal Communications Commission that enables people with a speech disability to use their own voice or a communication device to make a phone call.

Communicating with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in the Workplace
People who are deaf communicate using American Sign Language (ASL), fingerspelling, and a variety of other strategies, including: speech; speech-reading (lip reading); and writing.

Psychiatric Disabilities
The workforce includes many individuals with psychiatric disabilities who face employment discrimination because their disabilities are stigmatized or misunderstood. The ADA combats such employment discrimination, as well as the myths, fears, and stereotypes upon which it is based.

Working Effectively with People Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.
Discusses what is the impact of hearing loss at work, and accommodating the person who is deaf or hard of hearing.

Working Effectively with Persons Who Are Hard of Hearing, Late-Deafened, or Deaf
This brochure on persons who are hard of hearing, late-deafened, or deaf and the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities.

*Working Effectively with People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired.
Discusses accommodating the person who is blind or visually impaired, enhancing productivity on the job, and tips for on-the-job training.

Working Effectively with Persons Who Have Cognitive Disabilities.
Discusses who is likely to need an accommodation; what considerations might be important in the job application and interview process. And job training and performance considerations.

Discovering an Untapped Resource: Recruiting, Hiring, and Promoting People with Cognitive Disabilities
Resources for recruiting, accommodating, supporting, and providing assistive technology to employees with cognitive disabilities.

Working Effectively with Employees Who Have Sustained a Brain Injury.
Discusses implications of the ADA for individuals who have sustained a brain injury in the workplace accommodation process.

Workplace Accommodations for Persons with Musculoskeletal Disorders.
Discusses the types of accommodation to be considered when returning the employee with a musculoskeletal disorder to the job, maximizing the disabled employee’s potential for success.

*Employing and Accommodating Workers with Psychiatric Disabilities.
Discusses how psychiatric disabilities might affect an individual’s functioning in the workplace, and types of accommodations for workers with psychiatric disabilities.

*Employing and Accommodating Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries.
Topics include: What is a Spinal Cord Injury, Considerations in the Hiring Process, Solving Common Work Issues, Resources to Help with Accommodation and Retaining Employees.

*Employing and Accommodating Individuals with Histories of Alcohol and Drug Abuse.
Discusses what is “current” illegal use of a drug, what medical tests or inquiries are permitted, and what accommodations may be needed for a person with a history of drug or alcohol abuse.

*Employment Considerations for People Who Have Diabetes.
Discusses workplace implications of diabetes, reasonably accommodating a person who has diabetes, non-discrimination in training and promotion, etc.

Accommodating the Allergic Employee in the Workplace.
Discusses defining the allergic employee, allergies to workplace exposure, occupational exposure limits and the sensitive worker, and accommodating the allergic employee.

Causes of Poor Indoor Air Quality and What You Can Do about It.
Discusses what is poor indoor air quality and what are the causes and typical symptoms, and what could be reasonable accommodation under the ADA for a person who needs better air quality.

Working Effectively with People with Learning Disabilities.
What is a Learning Disability, impact, causes, potential functional limitations, and workplace accommodations.

Working Effectively with People with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.
Discusses accommodations for people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and how employers can assist in the advancement of people with ADHD.

Workplace Accommodations for Individuals with Arthritis.
Topics covered include an Overview of Arthritis; Who is considered an individual with arthritis; What types of accommodations should be considered.

Working Effectively with Individuals Who Are HIV-Positive.
Discusses what an employer can ask about medical conditions around HIV or AIDS, what types of accommodations should be considered, and issues of direct threat.

Working Effectively with Employees Who Have Epilepsy.
Main topics are: First Aid for Seizures; Is Epilepsy Really a Concern at the Work Place for those with an Active Condition?; Implications of the ADA for Individuals with Epilepsy; Accommodation Issues for the Individual with Epilepsy.

*Workplace Accommodations for People Living with Multiple Sclerosis
Discusses what is multiple sclerosis (MS) and what could be reasonable accommodation under the ADA for an employee with MS. Assistive Technology, Accommodations, and the Americans with Disabilities Act – This brochure provides some definitions and a starting point for finding the right technology to meet the needs of your employees.

Definition of Disability

ADA’s Definition of Disability
To be protected by the ADA, a person must meet the definition of the term “qualified individual with a disability,” as defined by the ADA and implementing regulations. This EEOC compliance manual section discusses the ADA definition of the term “disability.”

Definition of Disability Under the ADA: A Practical Overview and Update
This brochure on definition of disability under the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities edited by Susanne M. Bruyère, Ph.D., CRC, SPHR, Director, Program on Employment and Disability, School of Industrial and Labor Relations – Extension Division, Cornell University.

The Association Provision of the ADA
In addition to protecting qualified applicants and employees with disabilities from employment discrimination, one ADA provision – the "association" provision -- protects applicants and employees from discrimination based on their relationship or association with an individual with a disability, whether or not the applicant or employee has a disability.

Identity and Disability in the Workplace
The purpose of this article is to examine and discuss factors within the workplace that may affect the ability of individuals with disabilities to access and retain employment. The analysis is based on findings from a Cornell University study of human resource professionals in both the private and federal sectors.

Best Practices

Disability Etiquette – How to Accommodate
How to help without offense.

Business, Disability, and Employment: Corporate Models of Success
Case studies of 20 corporations’ experience in hiring and accommodating individuals with disabilities.

Best Practices for the Employment of People with Disabilities in State Government
This report highlights best practices of nine states that promote the hiring, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities in state government jobs.

Employment and Disability Policy: the role of the psychologist
Persons with minor or major disabilities represent a significant portion of the U.S. working-age population. Based on the 1993 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), approximately 30 million (19%) men and women 18 to 64 years of age report some type of physical or mental limitation. For approximately 55% of these individuals (about 10% of those 18 to 64), the limitations are severe.

Work and Disability: Issues and Strategies in Career Development and Job Placement
This is an exceedingly comprehensive text on a wide variety of subjects related to process of employment preparation, job development, career and workplace issues for persons with disabilities, and the professionals who assist them in these areas.

The Role of Disability Management Programs in ADA Compliance
This brochure on the role of disability management programs in American with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities.

Mediation and Title I of the ADA
This brochure on mediation and Title I of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities.

Diversity and the ADA
This brochure on diversity and the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities.

Survey of the Federal Government on Supervisor Practices in Employment of People with Disabilities
In 1999, the Presidential Task Force on the Employment of Adults with Disabilities (PTFEAD) funded Cornell University to conduct a survey of federal sector HR and EEO representatives regarding their experience implementing the employment disability nondiscrimination requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990(ADA) and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. One of the recommendations from this research was to conduct a follow-up study of federal agency supervisors and managers about their experience in accommodation and employment of persons with disabilities in the federal sector, and in addition to inquire about their awareness of the series of Executive Orders issued in 2000 supporting employment and accommodation of individuals with disabilities in the Federal workforce. This report provides information on the results from this survey, which was conducted in 2001.

Job Descriptions

Developing Job Descriptions
Employers may be daunted by what they fear will be a lengthy and complicated process. With constructive tools such as job analysis, sample job descriptions, and online resources like Career Onestop from the U.S. Department of Labor, informed employers can get valuable information, which includes the role of the ADA in developing job descriptions, how to formulate job descriptions, and special features of Career Onestop that assist with the development process.

Employee Benefits

*A Human Resource Perspective on Implementing the ADA.
Focuses on developing and implementing a human resource plan, to maximize organizational compliance with the ADA.

*Health Benefit Plans and the ADA.
Discusses how the ADA applies to the terms of health benefit plans, limitations and exclusions, disability-based distinctions, and dependent coverage.

Employee Benefits
Provides guidance and instructions for investigating and analyzing issues that arise with regard to life and health insurance benefits, long-term and short-term disability benefits, severance benefits, pension or other retirement benefits, and early retirement incentives.

Representations Made in Application for Disability Benefits
EEOC enforcement guidance regarding the position that representations made in connection with an application for disability benefits should not be an automatic bar to an ADA claim.

Categories of Workers

Contingent and Temporary Workers
The Contingent Workers Guidance discusses several bases on which a staffing firm, its client, or both may be liable for violations of the federal employment discrimination laws.

Federal Workforce and the ADA
How the ADA applies to the federal employees and employers.

Custom Training for Your Business
The Southwest ADA Center can provide customized onsite training for your business, your supervisors, your human resources staff, and/or your employees.

Reasonable Accommodation for Attorneys with Disabilities
Attorneys with disabilities may need a variety of accommodations to be able to perform essential functions of jobs. This guidance from the EEOC offers advice specifically tailored to the employment of attorneys.

Accessible IT

Accessible IT for People with Disabilities: HR Considerations
Online technology has made significant inroads into human resource (HR) processes over the past several years, including recruitment, benefits information dissemination, and training. The accessibility of the information technology (IT) used in these processes is much less well documented. The purpose of this study is to address this information need.

Implications of the Information Technology Revolution for People with Disabilities
The paper focuses on opportunities for the integration of persons with different types of disabilities in the information technology (IT) labor market. Recent IT developments are identified and examined for their potentially harmful or beneficial effects on access to the IT labor market for persons with disabilities.

Assistive Technology, Accommodations, and the Americans with Disabilities Act
This brochure on Assistive Technology, Accommodations, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities.

HR Processes and IT Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities: Improving Employer Practices under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act
The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) employment provisions on the employment practices of private sector business. The intended outcome of the research is to assist in the identification of employment practices that have been the most challenging in implementing the ADA, and to identify interventions that can be used by private sector employers and persons with disabilities to address these employment practices. Employment policy and practices that enhance both the hiring and retention of workers with disabilities are being examined.

Information Technology and the Workplace: Implications for Persons with Disabilities
The Internet improves access to employment and community for many people. However, there is growing concern that many Web sites are inaccessible to people with certain disabilities. This article examines the impact on people with disabilities of online human resources processes used for employee recruitment, benefits, and training.

Training & Quality Management

The ADA and Personnel Training
This brochure on personnel training and the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities.

The ADA and Total Quality Management
This brochure on total quality management and American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities.

The ADA and Training for Employment-Related Professionals: Implications for Rehabilitation Education
The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 holds promise for expanded employment opportunities for persons with disabilities. Critical to the realization of this potential is the education of those who facilitate entry into the work force, specifically managers, human resource professionals, and others who may impact successful work force participation such as labor union representatives and employee assistance professionals. This article focuses on the role of rehabilitation education and training in providing expanded information to these populations key to the integration of persons with disabilities into the work force.

Human Resources

A Human Resource Perspective on Implementing the ADA
This brochure on human resource perspective on implementing the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of a series on human resources practices and workplace accommodations for persons with disabilities edited by Susanne M. Bruyère, Ph.D., CRC, SPHR, Director, Program on Employment and Disability, School of Industrial and Labor Relations – Extension Division, Cornell University.

HR's Role in Managing Disability in the Workplace
It is estimated that there are 43 million Americans with disabilities, many of whom are significantly unemployed or underemployed. This article describes the role of employers, management, and especially the HR professional in minimizing disability discrimination.

Disability Employment Policies and Practices in U.S. Federal Government Agencies: EEO/HR and Supervisor Perspectives
The Presidential Task Force on the Employment of Adults with Disabilities (PTFEAD) provided support to Cornell University to conduct research on the policy and practice efforts of federal agency personnel in recruiting and retaining persons with disabilities in Federal employment.

Reviews, Surveys & Bibliographies

A Review of the Literature and Implications for People with Disabilities (E-Human Resources Literature Review)
To accomplish this overview, an extensive review of the literature on information technology applications to the employment process was conducted. Three human resources related uses of the Internet are explored in this review of current literature: E-recruiting, E-benefits/HR, E-training.

Comparative Study of Workplace Policy and Practices Contributing to Disability Nondiscrimination
An assessment of the impact of disability nondiscrimination legislation on employer practices in the United States and the United Kingdom.

A Comparison of the Implementation of the Employment Provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) in the United States and the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995 in the United Kingdom
This summarizes the results of recently conducted surveys in the United States and Britain to assess employer response in each of these countries to their respective employment disability nondiscrimination legislation.

The Impact of Business Size on Employer Response
Many years have passed since the employment provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) came into effect for employers of 15 or more employees. Americans with disabilities continue to be more unemployed and underemployed than their nondisabled peers. Small businesses, with fewer than 500 employees, continue to be the most rapidly growing part of our national economy and therefore a potential source of employment for American job seekers with disabilities. A Cornell University survey of human resource professionals examined how employers of different sizes are complying with the ADA. The authors point to needed ADA and accommodation services that rehabilitation counselors can provide to employers.

The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Contemporary Literature Overview
This article reviews the literature from the 3 years since the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health's (ICF's) endorsement, focusing on those articles that discuss (a) what the ICF means and how it can be used; (b) the general utility of the ICF for specific fields, such as nursing, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and audiology; (c) examples of applications for classification in particular disorders, such as chronic health conditions, neuromusculoskeletal conditions, cognitive disorders, mental disorders, sensory disorders, and primary and secondary conditions in children; (d) uses of the ICF to recode prior work across multiple surveys and across country coding schemes on disability-related national survey items; and (e) governmental uses of the ICF in the United States and selected countries abroad.

Special Issue on the American's with Disabilities Act: Editor's Overview
The purpose of this overview is to provide a context for the articles in this special issue of Rehabilitation Education on the Implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 for rehabilitation education. The author provides a brief background on the purpose of the Act and a summary of the provisions of each of the titles. The implications of the ADA for rehabilitation long-term training efforts, continuing education efforts, and for rehabilitation research are presented. The specific contributions of each article to these topics are summarized.

Executive Summary: Disability Employment Policies and Practices in Private and Federal Sector Organizations
Approximately one in six people has a disability, yet people with disabilities are often greatly under or unemployed compared to their non-disabled peers. This represents a significant loss of willing and able talent to both private and public sector organizations, as well as loss of income and social and economic participation for people with disabilities. This disparity is a function of inequity that has permeated social policy, access to education, training, and employment, as well as society’s attitudes. To address this disparity, both the US Department of Education National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) (grant #H133A70005) and the Presidential Task Force on Employment of Adults with Disabilities have separately funded initiatives to examine employer practices in response to the ADA.

A Selected Bibliography of Topics on Employment Practices
Cornell University is currently funded by the U.S. Department of Education National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research for a four-year Research and Demonstration entitled Improving Employment Practices Covered by Title I of the ADA (Grant # H133A70005). As a part of these efforts, we have done an extensive literature review on topics related to employer practices and the employment provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This bibliography is the result of these eighteen months of efforts.

A Comparison of the Implementation of the Employment Provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) in the United States and the Disability Discrimination Act of 1995 (DDA) in Great Britain and Northern Ireland
This summarizes the results of recently conducted surveys in the United States, Great Britain, and Northern Ireland to assess employer response in each of these countries to their respective employment disability nondiscrimination legislation.

The Implications of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 for Rehabilitation Psychologists: Guest Editor Overview
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 provides civil rights protection to individuals with disabilities similar to that provided to other individuals on the basis of race, sex, national origin, and religion. It guarantees equal opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the areas of: employment, state and local government services, public transportation, privately operated transportation available to the public, places of public accommodation, and telephone services offered to the general public. The provisions of the ADA have relevance to psychologists in terms of their practice, research, and training.